Guidelines in choosing the best water filter

Choosing the best faucet water filter for your specific needs may be tricky but with this list we can narrow down the search and provide you knowledge on the best faucet water filter to use in your home.

 What’s in your water

 The first step in determining whether a faucet water filter might make your tap water cleaner is to find out what’s in your water, and if it contains any dangerous, unregulated chemicals.

Once you know what’s in your tap water, consider what faucet water filter types is the best suit your family’s water consumption and budget. Contaminant removal claims vary, even within filter types. To be assured a filter will remove a certain contaminant, the package should say the filter meets NSF certification for that substance. NSF International is a nonprofit testing lab that also develops standards for the industry. Third-party labs that certify products to NSF standards include CSA, UL, and WQA, so you may see their certification seals too.

Types of faucet water filter

There is no one size fit all remedy in terms of faucet water filters, mainly because the list of harmful chemicals grow continually. Below are the most common types of faucet water filters and the contaminants they are designed to trap:

  1. Carbon filters include countertop pitchers, faucet-mounted models, undersink models (which usually require a permanent connection to an existing pipe), and whole-house or point-of-entry systems (usually installed in the basement or outside). Carbon, a porous material, absorbs impurities as the water passes through.
    What they remove: Lead, PCBs, chlorine by products (chloramines and trihalomethanes), certain parasites, radon, pesticides and herbicides, the gasoline additive MTBE, the dry-cleaning solvent trichloroethylene, some volatile organic compounds, some levels of bacteria (such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia) and a small number of pharmaceuticals.
  2. Reverse-osmosis systems push water through a semipermeable membrane, which acts as an extremely fine filter. They’re often used in conjunction with carbon filters. However, these systems waste 4 to 9 gallons (15 to 34 liters) of water for every gallon (3.8 liters) filtered.
    What they remove: Chemicals carbon filters may miss, including perchlorate, sulfates, fluoride, industrial chemicals, heavy metals (including lead), chlorine byproducts, chlorides (which make water taste salty), and pharmaceuticals.
  3. Ultraviolet light units disinfect water, killing bacteria. Countertop units can be found for under U.S. $100, but most whole-house units cost $700 and upward.
    What they remove: Bacteria. Experts recommend using them with carbon filters to remove other contaminants.
  4. Distillers, probably the least practical home method, boil and condense water. While countertop units are available, distillers use lots of electricity, generate excess heat, and require regular cleaning. Explore filters or other alternatives to remove your contaminants, or, in a pinch, buy distilled water.
    What they remove: Heavy metals (including lead), particles, total dissolved solids, microbes, fluoride, lead, and mercury.

Knowing the best faucet water filter to use in your situation greatly increases the effectivity of the faucet water filter. This produces drinking water that is safer to drink and with a crisp taste.If however lead levels are higher or if tests reveal other concerns, such as arsenic, bacteria, or parasites, contact your local health department for advice.